Transition of Thoughts

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Book Review – Kaleidoscope of Cheer and Hope

Book Review - Kaleidoscope of Cheer and Hope

Once the scale of this pandemic began to hit home, I am sure we all expected that a lot many books will be written and movies will be made in the years to come. It’s not everyday we live through a pandemic, do we? So thinking this, I picked up “Kaleidoscope of Cheer and Hope” by Manjulika Pramod.

The blurb goes like this –

This book is born in one of the most unprecedented times of history and it clearly aims to picture reality, create awareness, spread cheer, and convey that we are together in this pandemic. It thrives on authentic illustrations and vivid commentary on some of the most important events of the lockdown. The book promises visual meditation and helps in positive grieving.

The act of making personal notes and capturing the current situation into meaningful drawings gave birth to “Kaleidoscope of Cheer and Hope”. In these times of uncertainty and anxiety, the author felt a dire need to emphasize the importance of taking care of one’s mental health, social distancing, maintaining personal hygiene, expressing gratitude, and manifesting hope for humanity, and thus, she created a world for herself and others. Art turned out to be a powerful tool in this positive campaign.

For years, words and creations have been used as a response to uncertainty and catastrophe. The current scenario is no different. Hope this book helps you to introspect, emote, question, and preserve these unexpected times in more than one way.

These are unprecedented times not only for the current generation but for generations from the past and the future as well. The world hasn’t seen a pandemic of this kind in decades.

The cover of the book perfectly portrays what to expect. There are 50 different illustrations of life during the lockdown with interesting titbits thrown in about the way life went haywire.

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Book Review – Heroes of Kindness

Book Review - Heroes of Kindness

I have also wondered how so many of us are excited to read negative news time and time again. I guess it’s not because we want something bad to happen. But instead negativity seems to simply attract people more than positive acts. Positivity just seems par for the course. I knew that Dr Roshan had been writing about acts of kindness since quite a few years. And that’s why I wanted to download this book from the Blogchatter Library.

The blurb goes like this:

Imagine a newspaper filled only with positive stories. Have you ever seen one? Neither had the author Roshan, which is why he decided to create one himself. Heroes of Kindness showcases 50 acts of kindness and compassion by real-life individuals, acts that are guaranteed to bring a smile on your face and remind you that, perhaps, the world is not such a bad place after all.

The book has a simple title and cover page which goes well with the overall theme of what you are about to read. I like how Roshan mentions on the cover page “50 acts of kindness that will brighten your day”. It surely did brighten my evening.

These acts of kindness are from random people across the world from all walks of life such as doctors, shopkeepers, autorickshaw drivers and more. Each of them did something good without thinking of what they would get in return. With each story you smile or even cry happy tears in the end.

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Book Review – Papa & I

Book Review - Papa & I

Someone has said that only when you become a parent do you know what all it entails to become one. There’s so much we learn from our parents many of which a lot of us truly understand only when they are gone. But it doesn’t always have to be this way. When I saw Pooja’s book, I was quite keen to see what she has penned down.

The blurb goes like this:

“Sometimes I think my papa is an accordion. When he looks at me and smiles and breathes, I hear the notes.” – Markus Zusak

Papa & I is a collection of the author’s writings dedicated to her late father. In the middle of the COVID19 pandemic, many people are experiencing the grief of past losses and anticipatory grief of future fears. This compilation is for anyone who has lost a loved one to death, particularly a parent whom they deeply loved.

The title and the cover truly indicate that this book is an ode to her father and what all she has learnt from him over the years. I am sure so many of us can apply these learnings to our lives as well.

The book is divided into three sections – prose, poetry and random notes. Prose includes a letter and a few thoughts on how Pooja felt growing up around her parents and the way her father took care of her by instilling different values.

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Book Review – Who Killed Nina Daruwalla

Book Review - Who Killed Nina Daruwalla

I have always been a fan of thrillers and murder mysteries. But it’s been a couple of months since I read one. And so when Blogchatter asked me to review this one, I was quite interested.

The blurb goes like this:

Ambitious, a successful entrepreneur, and a divorcee — Nina Daruwalla is all this and more. Her ex-husband abhors her, her lover is mad about her, a reporter wants a scoop from her, and her cousin again needs her help. She ends up dead, her throat slit open. Now, Inspector Yaqoob Ansari and his team need to unmask the killer.

The question is – Who Killed Nina Daruwalla?

The title and the cover page are perfect as the reader knows what to expect. The use of a different kind of font size for the title is quite apt.

Ajit pens a gripping narrative on the murder of a successful entrepreneur – Nina Daruwalla. There are various individuals who play a role in her life and aren’t happy with her for a variety of reasons. But then would anyone actually harm her?

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Book Review – Just US Things

Book Review - Just US Things

I had read a few of Sushmita’s blog posts on her experiences about life in the US. What I liked was the sincerity in the way she narrated her thoughts. And so I was quite curious to download and check out her book from the Blogchatter Library.

The blurb goes like this

Irrespective of the countries, when you immigrate, you expect a cultural shock. Indian millennials are very well adapted to the American culture, thanks to television. But is that enough? Every day is different – even when you have travelled the world and have enjoyed every land and its culture. This book talks about the daily struggles and the existential battle of a new Indian immigrant in the US.

The title and the cover which has an outline of Statue of Liberty and other skyscrapers is quite interesting. Though I felt that rather than a white background, maybe some more colour could have been added.

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Book Review – Unlocked

First things first, I must admit that I have generally not been a big fan of poetry. Only recently have I myself tried to attempt writing some of it. But I do love history and I was intrigued at the fact that an author could attempt to tell historical stories in the form of poems. And that’s why I knew I had to pick this up from the Blogchatter library.

The blurb goes like this:

Is history your Waterloo? No more! The anthem ‘History is Boring’ is now passé. Here is a collection of historical tales about rebellious dancers and whiskeys; mysterious burials and missing keys; lost medals and quarantines and all you could only imagine to be. Presenting twenty-five delectable stories from the past that you may never have heard of before. What’s more? They are sassy and classy; easy and breezy; terse and very much in verse!

The title and the cover which has images of different historical events and figures over the pages of a book make you want to move forward and know what the book is all about.

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Book Review – 31 Miles

31 Miles - Book Review

From social entrepreneurship to being the Chief Architect of a literature and cultural festival; from being the director of the National Institute of Jewellery in Delhi to penning down a novel, Vinita Bakshi has quite a multi-faceted personality.

31 Miles is her debut foray into writing. Does it work? Let’s check it out.

The blurb goes like this –

Mansa has the perfect family life—a husband, two daughters and a big house. But she feels that something is missing. After shifting to a major city, she decides to take the reins of her life in her own hands, she decides to step out and seek a career.

While enjoying the new-found freedom and confidence, she completely immerses herself in her work and her new life. Till one fateful day when she finds herself embroiled in a passionate affair—with an online lover. And then everything falls apart!

31 Miles is the story of a woman who rediscovers herself after marriage, and works towards self-emancipation. Will she give it all up for the elusive mirage created by the stranger? What turn will her life take next?

Vinita’s portrayal of Mansa’s world is so life-like. She’s had an arranged marriage and is happily settled as a homemaker with two daughters. Or is she really ‘happily settled’? Though her husband is really supportive and caring, she feels that there’s something missing in her life. We hear about so many Mansa’s around the world day in and day out, don’t we?

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Book Review – Facing Up by Bear Grylls

Facing Up by Bear Grylls

Bear Grylls is regarded as one of the youngest Britons to climb Everest at the age of 23. Over the years since then, he has gone on to cross the North Atlantic in an open inflatable boat, led an expedition to one of the remotest unclimbed peaks in Antarctica and gone para-motoring over the Himalayas.

Facing Up: A remarkable journey to the summit of Mount Everest is his first book. Does it work? Let’s check it out.

The blurb goes like this:

At the age of twenty – three, Bear Grylls became the youngest Briton to reach the summit of Mount Everest. Having suffered a broken back only two years before in a freefall parachuting accident, he overcame incredible odds, not to mention great hardship and danger, to reach the top of the world’s highest mountain.

Facing Up is the story of his adventure, his courage and humour, his friendship and faith. 

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Book Review – The Peshwa: The Lion and the Stallion

The Peshwa: The Lion and the Stallion

The Peshwa: The Lion and the Stallion

Source: http://writersmelon.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/peshwa-1.jpg

Truth be told, I am not a big fan of mythological / historical fiction. But then, this book attracted me since Ram was my classmate at Indian School Muscat and I was keen to read his work considering all the good reviews it was getting. Is this a debut to remember for Ram? Let’s check it out.

The blurb goes like this –

It is the 18th century and despite the dominant Mughal rule, the Maratha Confederacy has established itself as a force to be reckoned with in the Indian Subcontinent. The fragile peace between the two powers is threatened when Balaji Vishvanath Bhat, Peshwa of the Confederacy, foils the plans of Nizam Ul Mulk of the Mughal Empire, and asserts the power of the Marathas. However, little does the Peshwa know that he has dealt the Nizam an unintended wound—one with roots in his mysterious past and one that he would seek to avenge till his last breath.

When the Peshwa surrenders his life to a terminal illness dark clouds gather over the Confederacy as it is threatened by a Mughal invasion as well as an internal rebellion.

All the while a passive spectator, the Peshwa’s son, Bajirao Bhat, now needs to rise beyond the grief of his father’s passing, his scant military and administrative experience, and his intense love for his wife and newborn son to rescue everything he holds dear. Will the young man be able to protect the Confederacy from internal strife and crush the armies of the Empire all while battling inner demons? Will he live up to his title of Peshwa?

The book is published by Westland Ltd. and it surely has quite an eye – catching cover showing Bajirao riding a stallion. This is sure to capture your attention and you surely want to move on to the story as soon as possible.

While I haven’t seen Bajirao Mastani, I must say that Ram has an excellent concept at hand. I am not sure why so less has been talked about Bajirao in our history books. But he sure was a mighty warrior. The book starts off by tracing the journey of his father – Peshwa Balaji Vishwanath who trains Bajirao initially and then finally Bajirao grows to be a successful soldier in his own right leading his troops onto the battlefield with utmost confidence. The conversations and the emotional connect between both father and son is quite effectively portrayed.

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Book Review – My Father is a Hero

My Father Is A Hero

My Father Is A Hero

Source: http://srishtipublishers.com/images/book
/my-father-hero-1.jpg

‘My Father is a Hero’ by Srishti Publishers is Nishant Kaushik’s fifth novel after four bestsellers. At it’s core, it is a heartwarming story of the love between a father and his daughter. Does it work? Let’s check it out.

The blurb goes like this –

Vaibhav Kulkarni has had few accomplishments worth boasting about in his modest life and career. Yet, his happy universe lies intact in the love and pride his ten-year-old daughter inspires in him.

Nisha Kulkarni justifies every reason to be the favourite child of Pune’s premier school – be it her academic brilliance, her exceptional facility with music, or simply her unassuming charm. With his daughter showing promising signs of a stellar success story, Vaibhav has made peace with own unrequited dreams of the past.

But when the girl mysteriously starts losing her mojo and spirals into despair and seclusion, Vaibhav faces the toughest test of his life as a single father – to reclaim his child’s trust and happiness. What distance will a middle-class man with limited means go to show his daughter the merit in believing in a dream? Read this gripping tale of love, courage, and of the emergence of an ordinary man as an extraordinary hero.

For starters, the book has a nice cover design which perfectly captures the essence of the story. Everything about it be it the bag or the father and daughter holding hands is so well thought of.

Nishant has a lovely story at hand. The book starts off slowly as it shows the deep bond of love between Vaibhav and Nisha. Along with going out of his way to ensure that the smile never leaves her face, he also makes it a point to instill the right virtues in her despite the challenges of bringing her up as a single parent.

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